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31 Lundy's Lane, Newmarket, Ontario L3Y 3R7, 905-898-1230

905-898-1230

Posts for tag: PAIN RELIEF

5 GREAT TIPS TO HELP YOU MAKE IT THROUGH ALLERGY SEASON

1. Pick your spots: One of the best ways to minimize your exposure to allergens such as pollen is to make smart choices. For example, pollen levels tend to be highest in the morning or when it hasn't rained in awhile. And let's not get started on wind, which can not only circulate pollen, but also tends to cause allergy-like symptoms – a bad combination that can ruin your day.

 2. Keep it out: Unless you've got a garden in your living room, the good news about pollen is that it's outside, which means you can take a few simple steps to keep it there. For starters, keep windows closed whenever possible (especially if it's windy). If you've been out, change your clothes once you get in the house, and try not to repeat-wear clothing. If it's been a particularly bad day in terms of pollen and/or you've spent most or all of the day outdoors, you may want to throw your clothes directly into the washer. And speaking of that garden in your living room, avoid bringing flowers into the house – unless putting a romantic gesture on display is worth the allergy symptoms that may accompany it.

3. Seek shade: The eyes are often the hardest hit by allergy symptoms. No one wants to spend their day rubbing watery, itchy, dry, red eyes, and trust us, it doesn't look good when you're making that big presentation in the boardroom. Two tips: 1) Wear sunglasses whenever you're outside during allergy season. (This is also a good idea because with spring comes sunnier skies, putting your eyes at risk for sun damage if they aren't protected.) 2) Carry saline drops to keep your eyes moist throughout the day, which will help when pollen, dust, etc., inevitably attack your field of vision.

4. Clean up: It's amazing how many health issues can be minimized with the simple act of washing your hands, and when it comes to seasonal allergies, it's a great recommendation. During allergy season, it becomes even more important because pollen and other irritants transfer easily from your hands to your face / mouth if you're not careful (much like germs that cause the common cold).

5. Eat smart: Research suggests vitamin C, which is found in a variety of fruits and vegetables, in addition to being available in supplement form, provides an antihistamine benefit that may help minimize allergy symptoms. (Histamine is released from cells as part of an allergic reaction.) Probiotics or "healthy bacteria," found in yogurt and increasingly added to a number of food products, also may reduce allergic symptoms caused by exposure to pollen. And don't forget that in general, a balanced diet high in antioxidants and other immune-boosting compounds helps your body defend whenever it's attacked – even by allergens.

 

Brought to you by Dr. Howard Zamick, Chiropractor, Newmarket Chiropractic & Sports Injury Clinic, Newmarket, Ontario

DR. HOWARD ZAMICK WILL BE IN THE OFFICE THIS SATURDAY FROM 8 a.m. - 12 noon., NEW PATIENTS WELCOME

HERE IS AN ARTICLE FROM  MEN'S HEALTH

Can a little extra pudge protect your pump? In a new study in the Journal of American Medical Association, people gained 6 pounds after quitting smoking—but also reduced their risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) by 53 percent after kicking the habit.

Obesity is a key risk factor for CVD, but smoking is an even bigger one—so ditching your nicotine fix significantly slashes your CVD risk, regardless if you gain weight, the study authors say.

Of course, no one wants to carry around an extra 6 to 13 pounds—the average amount of weight an American tacks on within 6 months of quitting, per JAMA—even if that trade-off appears to help your health. The problem is, nicotine suppresses your appetite, so when you give up cigarettes, your cravings intensify.

Here’s one way to keep your gut in check while you rehab your lungs: take 2 teaspoons of olive oil before meals. Like cigarette smoke, this Mediterranean wonder slows your stomach contractions and keeps you feeling full longer. It also triggers your body’s release of CCK, a hormone with appetite-reducing properties, says Marshall Goldberg, M.D., a professor of medicine at Thomas Jefferson University. The catch? You need a concentrated hit of the stuff for it to work. If you don’t want to take your 2 teaspoons straight, pour the oil on a plate and mop it all up with a piece of Italian bread.

 

Brought to you by Dr. Howard Zamick, Chiropractor, Newmarket Chiropractic & Sports Injury Clinic, Newmarket, Ontario

Regardless of the amount of miles we log every week, training for a marathon, or just a few miles every couple of days, most of us should have 2 pairs of the same runners allowing us to interchange them every other run.  The reason for this is that the shock absobing material usually takes close to 24 hours to bounce back to original form.  Interchanging our runners provides the most support for our feet.  Make sure that socks are also changed on a regular basis to avoid skin problems.  Make sure to stretch the Calves, and plantar fascia, before and after all runs.          Warming up our quads and hamstrings is a great way to get the most of our run without injury.  Pain in the heels/plantar fascia/calves/achilles heel may be prevented with the use of ORTHOTICS   Contact our office at 905-898-1230 to determine the need for ORTHOTICS.

Brought to you by Dr. Howard Zamick, Chiropractor, Newmarket Chiropractic & Sports Injury Clinic, Newmarket, Ontario. 25 years experience in treating Sports Injuries

Are you suffering from back or neck pain? You're definitely not alone, and we mean on a global scale. A series of studies emerging from the Global Burden of Disease 2010 Project, a massive collaboration between the World Health Organization, the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, the University of Queensland School of Population Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and the University of Tokyo, Imperial College London, clarifies the worldwide health burden of musculoskeletal conditions, particularly back and neck pain, in crystal-clear fashion, with low back pain identified as the number-one cause of disability worldwide and neck pain the number-four cause. Overall, musculoskeletal conditions represent the second leading cause of global disability. Findings emphasize the shift in global health that has resulted from disability making an increasingly larger footprint on the burden of disease compared to a mere 20-30 years ago. In addition, while more people are living longer, the flip side is that they do so with an increasing risk of living with the burden of pain, disability and disease compared to generations past.

Dr. Scott Haldeman, a neurologist and doctor of chiropractic, provides a summary of the project's findings that should make it abundantly clear that conditions many people may consider relatively harmless actually have tremendous potential for long-term health consequences:

  • Musculoskeletal conditions such as low back pain, neck pain and arthritis affect more than 1.7 billion people worldwide and have a greater impact on the health of the world population (death and disability) than HIV/AIDS, tropical diseases including malaria, the forces of war and nature, and all neurological conditions combined.
  •   When considering death and disability in the health equation, musculoskeletal disorders cause 21.3 percent of all years lived with disability (YLDs), second only to mental and behavioral disorders, which account for 22.7 percent of YLDs.
  • Musculoskeletal conditions represent the sixth leading cause of death and disability, with only cardiovascular and circulatory diseases, neonatal diseases, neoplasms, and mental and behavorial disorders accounting for more death and disability worldwide.
  • Low back pain is the most dominant musculoskeletal condition, accounting for nearly one-half of all musculoskeletal YLDs. Neck pain accounts for one-fifth of musculoskeletal YLDs.
  • Low back pain is the sixth most important contributor to the global disease burden (death and disability), and has a greater impact on global health than malaria, preterm birth complications, COPD, tuberculosis, diabetes or lung cancer.
  • When combined with neck pain (21st most important contributor to the global disease burden – death and disability), painful spinal disorders are second only to ischemic heart disease in terms of their impact on the global burden of disease. Spinal disorders have a greater impact than HIV/AIDS, malaria, lower respiratory infections, stroke, breast and lung cancer combined, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, depression or traffic injuries.
  • Current estimates suggest that 632.045 million people worldwide suffer from low back pain and 332.049 million people worldwide suffer from neck pain.

"The Global Burden of Disease Study provides indisputable evidence that musculoskeletal conditions are an enormous and emerging problem in all parts of the world and need to be given the same priority for policy and resources as other major conditions like cancer, mental health and cardiovascular disease," said Dr. Haldeman.

CHIROPRACTIC has been shown  by many research studies to be the most cost effective treatments for most Musculoskeletal injuries

Brought to you by Dr. Howard Zamick, Chiropractor, Newmarket Chiropractic & Sports Injury Clinic, Newmarket