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Posts for tag: nutrition

By Howie Zamick
March 31, 2013

GLUCOSAMINE AND CHONDROITIN

Glucosamine with chondroitin is a very popular supplement to support healthy joints. Something that most people don't realize, though, is the amount of substitutions that is occurring with this specific supplement.

Unfortunately certain manufacturers, in an attempt to maximize their profit, add cheaper ingredients that are not listed on the bottle, which generally are not harmful, but you are not getting what you purchased.

The glucosamine portion of the supplement is relatively inexpensive, so this ingredient is rarely adulterated. The problem lies with the chondroitin sulfate portion of the supplement. This ingredient is fairly expensive, so cheaper alternatives, such as keratin sulfate and cheaper polysaccharides, are substituted to produce a less expensive supplement. Even though the ingredients are changed, the manufacturer will still claim that the product contains glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate.

 

Many times the manufacturer will tell you that they tested the product, but use an inappropriate testing process that is not specific enough to detect any adulteration.

If you are truly curious about what is contained in the supplement that you are interested in, request a certificate of analysis. If the certificate of analysis doesn't specify the testing method, move on to another company or ask for further details.

When purchasing glucosamine with chondroitin it's worth every penny to not just purchase the cheapest product on the shelf. When you can ensure the quality of the product that you are purchasing is exactly what it claims to be, you can have the most confidence of attaining the desired outcome of using the product.

Brought to you by Dr. Howard Zamick, Chiropractor, Newmarket Chiropractic & Sports Injury Clinic, Newmarket, Ontario

HERE IS AN ARTICLE FROM  MEN'S HEALTH

Can a little extra pudge protect your pump? In a new study in the Journal of American Medical Association, people gained 6 pounds after quitting smoking—but also reduced their risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) by 53 percent after kicking the habit.

Obesity is a key risk factor for CVD, but smoking is an even bigger one—so ditching your nicotine fix significantly slashes your CVD risk, regardless if you gain weight, the study authors say.

Of course, no one wants to carry around an extra 6 to 13 pounds—the average amount of weight an American tacks on within 6 months of quitting, per JAMA—even if that trade-off appears to help your health. The problem is, nicotine suppresses your appetite, so when you give up cigarettes, your cravings intensify.

Here’s one way to keep your gut in check while you rehab your lungs: take 2 teaspoons of olive oil before meals. Like cigarette smoke, this Mediterranean wonder slows your stomach contractions and keeps you feeling full longer. It also triggers your body’s release of CCK, a hormone with appetite-reducing properties, says Marshall Goldberg, M.D., a professor of medicine at Thomas Jefferson University. The catch? You need a concentrated hit of the stuff for it to work. If you don’t want to take your 2 teaspoons straight, pour the oil on a plate and mop it all up with a piece of Italian bread.

 

Brought to you by Dr. Howard Zamick, Chiropractor, Newmarket Chiropractic & Sports Injury Clinic, Newmarket, Ontario

HERE ARE 5 GREAT DIET TIPS:

  1. Think plant-based meals: fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes (beans) and nuts / seeds.
  2. Instead of adding salt to your favorite meals, substitute herbs and spices to give your meals punch without the sodium content.
  3. Eat no more than 1-2 servings of red meat per month, and eat at least two servings of poultry and fish (preferably wild, not farmed) a week.
  4. Replace butter with "good" oils (olive, canola, etc.), which are high in monounsaturated fat, helping clear cholesterol from the body.
  5. Limit dairy intake and choose low-fat / fat-free options when it comes to milk, cheese and yogurt. That way, you can enjoy some of the health benefits of dairy (calcium, protein, healthy bacteria) without the high fat / cholesterol.

    Brought to you by Dr. Howard Zamick, Chiropractor, Newmarket Chiropractic & Sports Injury Clinic, Newmarket, Ontario
  6. =

Weight Training Reduces Men's Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

This finding is particularly interesting in that generally, we think of aerobic (endurance) exercise as an important intervention to prevent and treat diabetes. The study by A. Grontved and fellow researchers suggests that the addition of weight training to a healthy diet and aerobic exercise plan may offer additional protection against the development of type 2 diabetes.

Researchers collected data on 32,002 men enrolled in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study from 1990-2008. During that time, there were 2,278 new cases of type 2 diabetes during 508,332 person-years of follow-up. In their evaluation, the researchers noted that while weight training reduced diabetes risk by 34 percent, men performing 150 minutes per week, on average, of aerobic exercise experienced a 52 percent lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Moreover, men who performed weight training and aerobic exercise, at the above-noted threshold levels (150 minutes / week), showed the lowest risk of developing type 2 diabetes, (59 percent reduced risk) compared to those engaged in only aerobic or only weight training programs.

 Weight training may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes by helping to build lean mass. More lean mass means that muscle tissue will extract more glucose from the bloodstream to keep itself alive from moment to moment. Muscle tissue has a fast resting metabolic rate. Thus, more lean muscle mass translates into more calories (including glucose or blood sugar) burned per minute, even when you are at rest. This helps to keep blood sugar lower.

The other benefit is that weight-lifting burns many carbohydrate calories stored within our muscles as glycogen. Thus, after a weight training session, many of the carbohydrate calories consumed during the day are used to rebuild the muscles' glycogen fuel tank in preparation for the next bout of weight training. This effect also helps clear blood sugar (glucose) from the bloodstream, lowering blood sugar and reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes.

Reference

Grontved A, Rimm EB, Willett WC, Andersen LB, Hu FB. A prospective study of weight training and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus in men. Arch Intern Med, Aug. 6, 2012. 
 

Brought to you by Dr. Howard Zamick, Chiropractor, Newmarket Chiropractic & Sports Injury Clinic.


 

By Howie Zamick
January 07, 2013

Starting out 2013 with a plan to get in the best shape you can is tough.  Regular exercise, healthy diet, decreased stress, and better sleeping habits are all important.  Over the holidays I read "WHEAT BELLY", and have changed my eating habits accordingly.  Here is another article I came across that explains the benefits of ALA, or alpha lipoic acid.

Shed Belly Fat With Alpha Lipoic Acid
ALA is a potent antioxidant capable of enhancing the activity of other antioxidants including vitamin C, vitamin E, glutathione and coenzyme Q10. ALA is known to assist with diabetes, blood sugar control and cellular energy. Often referred to as R+ lipoic acid, ALA plays a key role in the processing of proteins, carbohydrates and fats. It also influences the balancing of blood sugar levels by enhancing glucose uptake. In type 2 diabetics, ALA has been shown to inhibit glycosylation (the abnormal attachment of sugar to protein) and has been used to improve diabetic nerve damage. Basically, ALA acts as a coenzyme, or partner, in the production of energy by converting carbohydrates into energy. A study published in Hypertension (2002) investigated the effects of ALA on insulin resistance, hypertension and free radical stress. Researchers found that ALA reduced blood pressure and prevented insulin resistance in rats who were fed sugar water by preventing an increase in oxidative stress (which is typical after a high-sugar or-carb meal). As an extra bonus ALA has been shown to improve energy metabolism and decrease oxidative stress associated with aging. I recommend taking one sachet of the Metabolic Repair Pack twice daily for optimal results.
Brought to you by Dr. Howard Zamick, chiropractor,  Newmarket Chiropractic & Sports Injury Clinic, Newmarket, Ontario